Child's Work Table, Woodworkers Fighting Cancer

Woodworkers Fighting Cancer 2015 – (Modified) Kids’ Table & Chair

Again this year, my son and I took part in Woodworkers Fighting Cancer. For 2015, my son reprises the role of “goofball” at various points in this video :).

The Woodworkers Fighting Cancer builds are, in my opinion, great projects to include kids in the shop. They’re approachable projects that a child can help out with some assistance, and have some fun and learn in the process.

I modified the original plans for this project by scaling it up for use by a 5th grader. The table height is 29″ and seat height is about 17 1/2″. I also made the surface of the table to be 42″ x 21″ as he will be using this to replace his current table I built for him in 2011 as he was entering the first grade. One other alteration we made is instead of a removable top with an box style underneath, we made 3 apron sides, leaving one side open for storage similar to a desk in school; leaving the top stationary.

The top is painted with grey chalk board paint. The apron, legs, and chair are painted in a dark green (the same paint used in last year’s toy chest project).

Thanks to Marc & Nicole Spagnuolo for once again heading up this year’s Woodworkers Fighting Cancer effort!

Coffee Table, Shop Tour

Shop Tour 2015 & What’s on the Bench

It’s been quite some time since my last video, and even longer since my last shop tour. As mentioned in my last post, 2015 hasn’t seen much shop time until just the last couple of months.

A lot has changed in the shop in that time. Now that I’ve been getting back into the shop, I wanted to show you around, and give you a quick update on a coffee table I’ve resumed working on.

I changed up the format a bit from my last videos, let me know what you think!

Hand Tools, Power Tools

A Bit of a Catch Up Post

The first half of 2015 really didn’t turn out to be much of a great woodworking period for me for various reasons. It hasn’t been until the last couple of months that I’ve been able to get any significant shop time, but now that I have been able to get more shop time, I wanted to get back to the site.

That doesn’t mean I’ve been totally idle though. This past summer, I was able to get what I consider two pretty cool things done that have been on my list for a while.

July – Lie-Nielsen Open House

I was able to take a comp day on the Friday of Lie-Nielsen’s open house this year. I’ve wanted to head up to Maine the last couple of years to see where some of the nicest hand tools are made. (I had to work on Saturday, which made it a somewhat anti-climatic Saturday, but I digress.)

I took what normally would have been a 3 1/2 hour drive, but with a Dunkin’ Donuts large iced coffee with my breakfast on the road, it made for closer to a 4 hour drive with “pit stops”. I arrived, and it was great. We got a tour of the facility from one of the employees – a very nice guy who mentioned he was originally from Plymouth, MA, (a stone’s throw from me) and we got to some small talk of things in this area. They had many folks demonstrating both outdoors under their tent and in their upstairs education workshop. I placed a low angle jack plane on order, and got to meet the man himself, Thomas Lie-Nielsen, who proceeded to apologize a couple of times for not having them in stock that day, but he was sure I’d love it when it came in. It came in the next week, along with an extra toothed blade, and yes, I do love it. It’s an excellent tool that I will continue to find many uses for. Thus far my main use has been as a shooting plane and a small jointing plane for smaller pieces.

August – I Finally Got a Bandsaw!

I’ve had a good bandsaw on my list for a few years now. Every time I got close to being able to pull the trigger, life would throw a bit of a curveball and we’d have to reallocate the funds.

The stars aligned quite nicely for this. I was able to sell a small amount of some stock that had vested at the time Woodcraft was having a nice sale, which also coincided with a Massachusetts sales tax holiday! It was an estimated savings of about $160-$170 between the sale and no sales tax.

So a very nice Laguna 14 Twelve bandsaw now sits in my shop! With the low ceilings in the basement, I had to double check all the measurements before buying to make sure I could fit it in there.

I've since started
I’ve since started “decorating” it with some stickers…

So we’re caught up… mostly. The project on my bench that I’ve resumed is a coffee table. The leg assemblies are mostly together with the exception of some trim pieces. Once that’s done, on to the top, and then finish!

More to come on that…

Toy Chest, Woodworkers Fighting Cancer

Woodworkers Fighting Cancer 2014 – Toy Chest

We took part in Woodworkers Fighting Cancer once again this year. One of the things I really like about the WFC projects, besides the fact that they’re built for a great cause, is that they are rather easy projects that you can easily invite kids into the shop to help out.

My son helped with this project, and is loving the toy chest that he now gets to use. As you’ll see in the video, he’s not too camera shy, and he had a couple of fun goofy moments!

To learn more about Woodworkers Fighting Cancer, and see the other great toy chests built, visit http://woodworkersfightingcancer.com.

Hand Tools, Shop Time

A Woodworking Mindset During An Unintended Hiatus

Unfortunately, various events of late have kept me from getting into the shop as much as I would like. From end of summer and back to school, to giving my dad some extra help as my mother has experienced increasing health issues the last few weeks, I haven’t spent too much time in the shop from mid-August onward.

I did however, get a few hours on a Friday a couple of weeks ago to attend the Lie-Nielsen hand tool event in Manchester, CT. I have to say it was nice getting back into a woodworking setting and mindset. This particular event in Manchester, CT was hosted at the Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. I’ve been to a few other Lie-Nielsen events, but this one by a good margin was the largest. Lie-Nielsen will often have another vendor or two with them, but there were several at this event: Tico Vogt (premium shooting board maker), Fine Woodworking Magazine, Catherine Kennedy (Tool Engraving), and others who I forget their name, but dealt with molding and wooden hand planes. If you have never been to one of these events, you owe it to yourself to try and get to one. You can test drive any tool they have there, and you get a great feel for what a quality, sharp tool should feel like. Ask a question, and you’ll get a detailed answer and/or a great demonstration.

So here are a few pics:

 

Nicholson Workbench

Time For A New Workbench | Nicholson Workbench Part 2

I had planned on getting part 2 of the Nicholson workbench walkthrough out sooner, but this little thing called summer got in the way a bit. Anyway… Enjoy!

Here is The Wood Whisperer episode demonstrating flattening a bench using a router… http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/flattening-workbenches-and-wide-boards-with-a-router/

Glen Huey’s Popular Woodworking video on dog holes using a router http://youtu.be/fKMYD8jYWWQ

Nicholson Workbench

Time For A New Workbench | Nicholson Workbench Part 1

I mentioned back in my New Year’s post that I intended to build a new workbench this year. What I had was not impossible, but not ideal either. I was always able to cobble together a solution to get a workpiece held in place, but it would cost more time in setup. Once it was in place, any sort of hand tool work would cause the bench to wobble and at times slide on  the floor.

When deciding on what type of bench I would build, I had a few things in mind:

  • The workbench should follow the basic rule of being a three dimensional clamping surface. Legs should be flush with the aprons (as outlined in Christopher Schwarz’s Workbenches: From Design & Theory to Construction & Use).
  • Economical. A workbench build can cost very little, or a relatively large amount of money. On the more expensive bench builds, one can easily spend $1400 or more between materials and vise hardware, which is perfectly fine for folks where that fits their budget. I firmly believe though that there is a bench that is suitable for just about any budget.
  • Flexible. By this, I mean a style that if you don’t follow specific plans to the letter, but take the overall idea and make it your own, you can come up with a bench that will suit your needs.
  • Heavy enough to not slide or move when doing hand tool work.

So what I chose was a Nicholson style bench, also known as an English joiner’s bench. Like the Roubo, it is a “clean slate” type of bench that allows for many different configurations of vise hardware and placements.  One of the characteristics of the Nicholson is that it can be made of construction grade lumber, which gives it a bit of an edge in the “Economical” department. For my bench, I went with douglas fir. Doug fir is more easily found than Southern Yellow Pine in construction grade lumber in my area. It’s tougher than the typical spruce construction grade stuff at the big box stores in the Northeast, but still softer than most furniture grade woods. I’d rather my bench get a ding, than my workpiece. While I built this bench, I took some video, and a bunch of pictures that I summarized in the “part 1” video above… So enough reading and now time for more viewing… check out the video! Thanks for watching!